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Electric guitar

Fender launches all-new Player Plus electric guitar and bass models with new finishes and switching options

Fender has announced the expansion of its Player series of electric guitars and bass guitars, with the goal of meeting the needs and nurturing the next generation of gamers – the Player Plus series.

Arriving in the form of SSS and HSS configured Stratocasters, two individual Telecasters, an Active Precision Pass, and two Active Jazz Bass models, Fender’s new offerings take inspiration from the brand’s iconic body shapes, while aiming for to provide improved playability and comfort.

Designed with the aim of providing a “next level playing experience” for seasoned players and budding guitarists, each model features 12 “radius keys with rolled edges, lockable tuners and new noiseless pickups.

They also aim to exploit sonic avenues rarely seen on Fender models, with a range of push-pull pots and toggle switches serving a host of intriguing mic combos.

But perhaps the most notable addition is the range’s eye-catching color scheme, which features striking new and reworked finishes such as Tequila Sunrise, Opal Spark, Cosmic Jade, Silverburst, Belair Blue, Olympic Pearl and Silver Smoke, to name just a few.

Commenting on the latest made in Mexico range, Fender Products EVP Justin Norvell commented, “We designed the Player Plus series to match the unique characteristics of today’s gamers and creators. When we first launched the Player Series in 2018, we set a new standard for what an entry-level Fender could be.

“We have delivered a range of visually striking performance instruments that exemplify Fender’s philosophy: honoring our past while looking to the future.

In addition to strengthening the Player line, the Player Plus line appears to replace Fender’s Deluxe line, which also featured a Nashville Telecaster and Stratocaster configured in HSS, with Noiseless pickups.

Read on for all the info on Fender’s latest user-friendly guitars.

Fender Player Plus Stratocaster and Player Plus Stratocaster HSS

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Fender Player Plus Guitar

Fender Player Plus Stratocaster in Tequila Sunrise (Image credit: Fender)
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Fender Player Plus Guitar

Fender Player Plus Stratocaster in Opal Spark (Image credit: Fender)
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Fender Player Plus Guitar

Fender Player Plus HSS Stratocaster in Cosmic Jade (Image credit: Fender)
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Fender Player Plus Guitar

Fender Player Plus HSS Stratocaster in Silverburst (Image credit: Fender)

First, the SSS and HSS configured Strats, which aside from the modified pickup pairing arrive with identical specs with a 12-inch fingerboard radius and a C-shaped maple neck with bezels. rolled.

These comfort-oriented specifications are joined by 22 medium jumbo frets, a choice of maple or rosewood fingerboards, a two-point tremolo bridge system, and locking tuners.

In the pickup department, the Strats sport newly designed Player Plus Noiseless single coils, and both feature push-pull tone pots. While the control triggers a coil split in HSS’s additional Player Plus humbucker, the pot conversely adds the loaded single-coil Strat neck pickup at positions one and two.

The control circuit is completed with a five-position selector, a secondary tone control and a master volume knob.

The regular and HSS-equipped Player Plus Stratocasters are now available in a range of finishes – including Cosmic Jade, Silverburst, Olympic Pearl, and Tequila Sunrise – for $ 999 and $ 1,029, respectively.

Fender Player Plus Telecaster and Player Plus Nashville Telecaster

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Fender Player Plus Guitar

Fender Player Plus Telecaster in Cosmic Jade (Image credit: Fender)
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Fender Player Plus Guitar

Fender Player Plus Telecaster in Silver Smoke (Image credit: Fender)
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Fender Player Plus Guitar

Fender Player Plus Telecaster Nashville in Three Sunburst Colors (Image credit: Fender)
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Fender Player Plus Guitar

Fender Player Plus Telecaster Nashville in Opal Spark (Image credit: Fender)

Next up is the Player Plus Telecaster and the Player Plus Nashville Telecaster. While the former is a modern take on the conventional Tele model, the latter equips Fender’s famous single-cut with an additional Strat-style center single coil for additional tonal options.

Again, the guitars come equipped with Fender Player Plus Noiseless pickups, which are at the mercy of push-pull tone switches. The regular Tele’s switch engages the two pickups in series for increased power and body, while the Nashville Tele again engages the neck pickup in switch positions one and two.

Build-wise, the standard 12-inch radius fingerboard with rolled edges, a modern C Player Plus profile neck, and 22 medium jumbo frets make the cut, with a modern six-saddle Tele bridge with steel saddles. block steel as well.

A range of colors is offered, with highlights such as Opal Spark, Aged Candy Apple Red and Silver Smoke.

The Player Plus Telecaster and the Player Plus Nashville Telecaster are now available for $ 999 and $ 1,029, respectively.

Fender Player Plus Active Precision Bass

Fender Player Plus Guitar

Fender Player Plus Precision Bass in Olympic Pearl (Image credit: Fender)

Moving on to the bass department, we have a freshly designed Precision Bass, which aims to deliver the “punch and growl” that defines Fender’s four-string sounds.

A three-band active EQ features switchable active / passive operation for increased tone sculpting flexibility, and works with the all new Player Plus Noiseless Precision and Jazz Bass pickups.

Other features include a HiMass four-saddle bridge, a 12-inch radius fingerboard with rolled edges, and – again – a modern C-neck profile, included for a silky smooth ride on the fingerboard.

The Fender Player Plus Precision Bass comes in Silver Smoke, Cosmic Jade, Three-Color Sunburst, and Olympic Pearl, and is available for $ 1,049.

Fender Player Plus Jazz Bass and Player Plus Jazz Bass V

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Fender Player Plus Guitar

Fender Player Plus Active Jazz Bass V in Tequila Sunrise (Image credit: Fender)
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Fender Player Plus Guitar

Fender Player Plus Active Jazz Bass in Cosmic Jade (Image credit: Fender)

Last but not the least, the Player Plus Jazz Bass and Player Plus Jazz Bass V models. As the names suggest, the only thing that separates the two is an extra bass string, meaning they both come equipped with a multitude of identical specifications.

As such, both feature a 12-inch radius fingerboard, modern C-shaped neck, HiMass bridge, and Player Plus Noiseless Jazz Bass pickups.

Again, Jazz Bass pickups are at the mercy of a nifty switch that aims to extract as much tone from the circuit as possible, with an active / passive toggle switch paired with an active three-band EQ for the hands. on the tweaking experience.

Three-Tone Sunburst, Cosmic Jade, Opal Spark, Belair Blue and Olympic Pearl are just a few of the colorways offered for the Player Plus Jazz Bass and Jazz Bass V, both available for $ 1,099 and $ 1,149, respectively.

To learn more, visit Fender.


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Electric guitar

Best Electric Guitar Stands on Amazon (2021 Review)

If you are a guitarist, electric guitar stands are an essential part of your gear. Whether you play a bass, mid-range, or high-end guitar, having an appropriately sized stand to support your instrument is crucial. However, electric guitars are so versatile that it can be difficult to know which size stand is best for your guitar’s unique setup. You should also consider your pickguard, neck, pegs, accessories, and the weight of the rack. It can all get a bit overwhelming. We are here to help you. Our goal is to make shopping easier for you. If you just want to buy a stand for guitar practice or store your guitars in a bedroom, check out our top picks in the product list above. But if you need more detailed information on choosing an electric guitar stand, including how much you need to pay, read on.

What are the tips for finding the right electric guitar stand?

Make sure you buy a guitar stand that is right for you. If you want to play in a full band, you will need a stand that can best hold your instruments. Measure your guitar to find the best bracket size for it. It should be at least a foot wider than your instrument and as long as your neck. Take into account the weight of your stand. You don’t want a heavy stand because your electric guitar will sit on a hardwood floor. Check if the guitar you buy can be placed at any level. This is important if you plan to place it on carpeted floors.

What Should I Consider When Buying an Electric Guitar Stand?

We could go on and on about the different aspects of electric guitars, but you get the gist of it here. First, you need to choose your power source: either batteries or AC adapters. Batteries are obviously the most practical choice. If you are a dedicated gamer who has a huge collection of power, a battery is the way to go. They are also more expensive, and if you have a big guitar this could end up being a problem (especially if your setup is already very tight). AC adapters are a good compromise, although they don’t offer the same level of flexibility as batteries. Your electric guitar should lie flat when not in use (not on its side, obviously). It’s pretty much universal, so you shouldn’t have too much trouble finding a mount that does this. The neck of an electrical device should rest squarely on the floor, which means you can’t mount it on a wall or anything. Most electric necks are staggered, with the nut and saddle slightly forward. A staggered neck is best when playing hard or fast over bumps or rough areas, as it makes it easier to achieve a firm strumming motion.

What is the price of electric guitar stands?

Cheap

The cheapest electric guitar stands cost from $ 20 to $ 40. For that price, the stand will be a basic, no-frills piece of furniture that may not have a cable trigger.

Midrange

In the $ 50 to $ 100 range, you will find a greater variety of stands for electric guitars. The build and material quality will likely be better, and you might find freestanding models at this level.

Expensive (and most desirable)

The most expensive stand you can find for an electric will cost anywhere from $ 100 to over $ 300. These mounts will not only hold your guitar, but will also include other accessories such as amps, cables, amp and guitar mounts, standalone turntables, case, strap, rack, cable box, bag or a support. It should have more features, such as built-in speakers and headphone jacks, than a cheaper stand.

How do you choose your selection of the best electric guitar stands?

When deciding which electric guitar stands are the best to buy, there are three key factors you need to consider. These are the brand, the price and the reviews.

Mark

When selecting our products, we always take into account brands known for their quality. We select brands with many years of experience, which ensures that the products are of high quality and stand the test of time.

Price

Price is an important factor in any purchase. To make sure that everyone can afford to get the guitar they want, it’s important to consider a wide price range. For this reason, our list offers you a range with a variety of price options, so that everyone can find the perfect guitar stand for them.

Comments

Reviews are essential in helping us make the right choice when purchasing a product like a guitar, so we seek the reviews of customers who have already experienced the benefits of purchasing these guitar stands. These reviews help us understand how the stands are great for tidying, playing, touring, rehearsing, teaching, playing, training, working on projects or just spending time. .

What Features Should You Look For In Electric Guitar Stands?

You might think that an electric guitar stand is a simple purchase, but with so many options available to you, you might find some aspects of choosing the ideal stand to be a bit tricky. Some of these features are:

Adjustability

No one wants to stand on a flat surface when playing their guitar. An adjustable guitar support surface makes it easy to adjust the height and angle so your guitar is in the exact position you want it to be. It makes the experience more enjoyable and engaging.

Metal

The metallic material used in guitar stands is critical to the overall performance of the stand. Choose a metal stand made of a quality material such as stainless steel. A solid metal guitar stand is extremely strong and reliable.

Drink

If you prefer something more natural and beautiful, then a wooden guitar bag is the way to go. Whether you choose natural cherry, oak, maple, mahogany, or any other wood material, the choice is yours.

Lock system

For secure, high-quality performance, an adjustable stand with locking mechanisms is essential. It locks into position once set. In some models, this lock can be operated via a rotary dial, while others have a push button release.

About the electric guitar stand

An electric guitar stand can be an expensive purchase, so it’s important to find one that you can afford. Some electric guitar stands are also a bit more expensive than others, which can make it difficult to decide which option is best for you. While there are some basic specifications that you should take into account when purchasing an electric stand, there is a whole world of options that will make your guitar buying experience much easier. Here’s everything you need to know about choosing and using an electric guitar stand, and some of our favorites.


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Electric guitar

Classical, fusion, electric guitar: the curious soundscape of Abhisek Mallick

Abhisek Mallick (Photo: IANS)

By Sukant Deepak

New Delhi- He was four years old when he started learning tabla with Pt. Amar Bose, before switching to sitar at the age of seven. However, Abhisek Mallick points out that his percussion training helped shape him as a musician.

Adding that to be a successful artist, it is essential to have a deep understanding of taal or rhythm cycles, he adds: “Melody and rhythm go hand in hand. The tabla training laid the foundations of my musical journey and helped decode the subtleties of Indian layakari, the mathematical aspect of our music. And let’s not forget, in classical Hindustani, the only companion of any instrumentalist or singer during the performance is the Tabla. So knowing it is like knowing your mate, ”said the recipient of the President’s Gold Medal from All India Radio.

But it’s not just the classic that moves Mallick. Talk to this youngest member of India’s best-known band, “Rhythmscape”, and he remembers that when the band’s debut album came out in 2003, he was still in college. “My first concert with Rhythmscape was in 2012 after meeting and playing Bickram Ghosh before him. My journey has started since then and I have had the chance to play, learn and travel with the band all over the world until now.

“In fact, as part of his Drums of India project, I have had the chance to perform at some of the most coveted music festivals in the United States, Europe and South Africa. The Cape Town Jazz Fest is part of.”

Tell him about his electric sitar that he designed himself, and the musician says that with the advent of fusion music, as sitar players started playing in fusion bands, a necessity is Born to make the Sitar sound stand out among instruments like keyboards, electric guitars, bass guitars and drums which all sound very loud and powerful, which would not have been possible with an acoustic sitar.

“Fortunately, I haven’t experienced any criticism from the purists, probably because my Electric Sitar sounds like a Sitar and not like a distorted electric guitar like it used to in most cases before. I have also successfully experimented with its performance in selective fusion gigs to attract Generation X. I have done a lot of research to select the right combination of mic and processor for my electric sitar so that the originality of the sound is kept. My goal has always been to magnify and embellish the original sound by electrifying the instrument.

Realizing that the audiences for classical and fusion are distinct, Mallick prefers to keep his two “avatars” distinct. He says, “This way I can continue to experiment with different genres of music while keeping my roots in Hindustani classical music intact.”

Mallick, who was part of the recently organized HCL “Baithak”, believes more corporate houses should come forward to sponsor and promote musicians and artists. “Mandatory CSR activities of corporate houses should also focus on the well-being of musicians and artists. HCL does a tremendous job in terms of creating opportunities, promoting and disseminating artists and their work.

Currently working on a digital concert series where performances by other artists from across the country will be presented on an international platform, Mallick, along with other musicians, has formed the group “VEDA”. “I play Sitar, Ratul Shankar plays Cajon and Mainak Bumpy Chowdhury is on bass. This is basically an instrumental setup although sometimes we have singers of different genres. At the moment, we are working on our next album which we plan to release in October, ”he concludes. (IANS)


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Electric guitar

Best Electric Guitar Amps: Fender, Marshall, More Beginner Amps

Featured products are independently selected by our editorial team and we may earn a commission on purchases made from our links; the retailer may also receive certain verifiable data for accounting purposes.

An amplifier is an essential companion to bring out the full potential of your electric guitar. Whether you’re training on your own at home or getting ready for a tour, you’ll need one that is reliable, durable, and can sound exactly the way you want it to. This is a major investment for any serious musician, and will most likely last for years. For this roundup, we’ve focused on amps that can fit into dorms and small apartments, but are also powerful enough to play gigs in cafes, bars, and with bands in various venues.

Electric Guitar Amps Buying Guide

Types of amps: A tube amp (also sometimes called a “tube amp”) was among the earliest amplifier models ever made, and they still sound great. These are powered by preamp and power tubes – little glass bulbs on the back that give it a powerful, warm sound. And while the rock gods of the ’60s and’ 70s primarily used them, they aren’t the only ones available these days. The other common type that you will find is a solid state amp. These operate on transistor circuits, bypassing light bulbs completely. Technology has come a long way with solid-state amps, allowing them to mimic the effects of tubes, while being louder than you likely ever need, even when playing a show. But it’s mostly a matter of preference, and it’s worth taking a look at the stats and attributes of each to see what will work best for you, your guitar, and your playing style.

Connectivity: Bluetooth connectivity is another big leap forward in technology that may be new to anyone who hasn’t bought an amp in years. Not only to listen to you on headphones while you play (without being tied by wires), but also to connect to your smartphone. Ports are still needed, and even if you don’t plan on using them all now, you might be able to be somewhere down the road. A second input lets you share your speaker with another guitarist, while XLR and phantom power is designed for mics, and a USB port lets you record directly from your amp into your favorite studio program.

Power : Just because an amp can get extremely loud doesn’t mean you need it. Think about what you will be using primarily for this and consider the potency from there. A 10- or 15-watt amp is great for practicing at home or at a friend’s house, while a 100-watt amp will be more than enough for a rehearsal space or a local gig. The wattage goes further with tube amps as well, and a lower number can still be loud enough to shake the room.

Weight: Although they are lighter than they were decades ago, tube amps can still get heavy. It might not be a big deal if it stays in a corner of your room all the time, but carrying it from gig to gig can get exhausting if it’s difficult for you to pick it up. This goes for amps across the board though, so if you’re constantly charging and unloading, make sure you can lift it comfortably.

Play live: If you’re playing in venues with a main soundboard, solid-state amps most often have an XLR output that can go straight to the sound technician’s office. Not all tube amps have this, and if they don’t, you’ll have to physically mic it up and make sure the placement is correct every time. Taking into consideration the type of music you play also helps determine which amp is right for you.

What are the best electric guitar amps?

If you can’t go to a music store to try them out right now, we’ve handpicked these powerful amps to help you start your search. They are great for all levels of musicians, but most importantly great first amps to have, as the experimentation is endless, and this is the best way to become familiar with all the possibilities that you and your guitar can create.

1. Fender ’68 Custom Pro Reverb 40W combo amp

Guitar center

This timeless 40-watt Fender mixes the best sounds, effects and aesthetics of the past with modern styles and the flexibility to find your ideal sound.

Legendary tube reverb and crystal clear Fender clarity shine here and give that clean, classic, bluesy feel. It’s modified to a single-channel format, with two power tubes and three preamp tubes inside to help create a shimmering, dreamy sound, or get loud enough to play the lead.

This is inspired by the original 1968 Fender model, with useful adjustments for portability and efficiency. Overall weight is reduced to less than 35 pounds (the original was almost double), with a 12-inch Celestion NeoCreamback speaker inside to deliver that iconic Fender sound.

It works well for just about any style, and even for recording. Up front there’s an illuminated switch and two inputs, as well as a full treble / mid / bass EQ section, as well as reverb, speed and intensity to control the effects of tremolo and pulsed vibrato.

Feedback is drastically reduced, and this comes with a vintage-style two-button foot switch for easy transitions. The amp also integrates effortlessly into the pedals, giving you even more possibilities to mix and match, and ultimately evolve your playing.

To buy:
Fender 68 Custom Pro Reverb 40W 1×12…
To
$ 1,399.99

2. Vox AC30C2 30W 2 × 12 tube guitar combo

Vox Custom AC30C2 30W 2x12 Tube Guitar Combo Amp

Amazon

A mix of preamp tubes is what powers this 30-watt Vox, handling clean tones, high gain and everything in between.

There are four inputs here, for normal and top boost, each with its own volume knob (as well as bass and treble for the latter). The reverb has its own tone and level controls, giving you more flexibility as to the shimmering effect you’re looking for, along with speed and depth for the tremolo as well. A tone cut control acts as a convenient filter, and behind the signature diamond grille are two 12-inch Celestion G12M Greenback speakers, with a switchable 8/16 Ohm output jack.

While it sounds gorgeous and is loud, be aware of the weight, as this one is an absolute beast at over 70 pounds (the three different handles are a big help when it comes to lifting it).

To buy:
Vox custom guitar combo amp
To
$ 1,399.99

3. Marshall Studio Vintage 20W 1 × 10 Tube Guitar Combo Amp

Marshall Studio Vintage 20W 1x10 Tube Guitar Combo Amp Black

Amazon

You won’t need a giant wall of Marshall amps behind you to get the brand’s powerfully vintage sound at home – one of them will do just fine.

This 20 watt tube amp is based on Marshall’s 1959SLP. In fact, the top panel is identical to the original, with a full EQ section and volume control for each channel (treble and normal). At the rear, this model offers five outputs for connecting it to different speakers, a DI output for studio recording and an effects loop with its own on / off switch.

It can handle a nice thick tone for rhythm parts and switch to a rumbling solo tone just as well.

To buy:
Marshall Studio Vintage 20W 1×10 Tube…
To
$ 1,699.99

4. Orange Crush Pro CR60C 60W Guitar Combo Amplifiers

Orange Amplifiers Crush Pro CR60C 60W Combo Guitar Amp Orange

Guitar center

It’s hard not to like this eye-catching amp, but it offers more than just cool aesthetics.

The CR60C is part of the Orange Crush range. This is a reliable two-channel solid-state combo amp with a 12-inch Voice of the World speaker inside. This delivers crisp, crisp sound, with its own clearly labeled control panel for bass, treble, and volume. The same goes for flipping the switch and getting dirty, with designated knobs for gain, volume, and full EQ. On the back there are two speaker outputs, effects loop jacks and even a slot for pedals.

To buy:
Orange Amplifiers Crush Pro CR60C 60W…
To
$ 549.00


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Electric guitar

Classical, fusion, electric guitar: the curious soundscape of Abhisek Mallick

By Sukant Deepak

New Delhi, August 7 (IANS): He was four years old when he started learning tabla with Pt. Amar Bose, before switching to sitar at the age of seven. However, Abhisek Mallick points out that his percussion training helped shape him as a musician.

Adding that to be a successful artist, it is essential to have a deep understanding of taal or rhythmic cycles, he adds, “Melody and rhythm go hand in hand. The tabla training laid the foundations of my career. musical and helped me decode the intricacies of Indian layakari, the mathematical aspect of our music. And let’s not forget, in classical Hindustani, the only companion of any instrumentalist or singer during the performance is the Tabla. knowing is like knowing your mate, ”says this recipient of the President’s Gold Medal from All India Radio.

But it’s not just the classic that moves Mallick. Talk to this youngest member of India’s best-known band, “Rhythmscape”, and he remembers that when the band’s debut album came out in 2003, he was still in college. “My first concert with Rhythmscape was in 2012 after meeting and performing Bickram Ghosh before him. My journey has since started and I have had the chance to play, learn and travel with the band all over the world until ‘now.

“In fact, as part of his Drums of India project, I have had the chance to perform at some of the most coveted music festivals in the United States, Europe and South Africa. The Cape Town Jazz Fest is part of.”

Tell him about his electric sitar that he designed himself, and the musician says that with the advent of fusion music, as sitar players started playing in fusion bands, a necessity is Born to make the Sitar sound stand out among instruments like keyboards, electric guitars, bass guitars and drums which all sound very loud and powerful, which would not have been possible with an acoustic sitar.

“Fortunately, I haven’t experienced any criticism from the purists, probably because my Electric Sitar actually sounds like a Sitar and not like a distorted electric guitar like it used to in most cases. have also successfully experimented with its performance in selective fusion gigs. to attract Generation X. I have done a lot of research to select the right combination of mic and processor for my electric sitar so that the originality of the sonority is preserved. My goal has always been to magnify and embellish the original sonority by electrifying the instrument. “

Realizing that the audiences for classical and fusion are distinct, Mallick prefers to keep his two “avatars” distinct. He says, “This way I can continue to experiment with different genres of music while keeping my roots in Hindustani classical music intact.”

Mallick, who was part of the recently organized HCL “Baithak”, believes more corporate houses should come forward to sponsor and promote musicians and artists. “Mandatory CSR activities of corporate houses should also focus on the well-being of musicians and artists. HCL does a tremendous job in terms of creating opportunities, promoting and spreading artists and their work. . “

Currently working on a digital concert series where performances by other artists from across the country will be presented on an international platform, Mallick, along with other musicians, has formed the group “VEDA”. “I play Sitar, Ratul Shankar plays Cajon and Mainak Bumpy Chowdhury is on bass guitar. plan to release in October, ”he signed.


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Electric guitar

The curious soundscape of Abhisek Mallick

Adding that to be a successful artist, it is essential to have a deep understanding of taal or rhythmic cycles, he adds, “Melody and rhythm go hand in hand. The tabla training laid the foundations of my career. musical and helped me decode the intricacies of Indian layakari, the mathematical aspect of our music. And let’s not forget, in classical Hindustani, the only companion of any instrumentalist or singer during the performance is the Tabla. knowing is like knowing your mate, ”says this recipient of the President’s Gold Medal from All India Radio.

But it’s not just the classic that moves Mallick. Talk to this youngest member of India’s best-known band, “Rhythmscape”, and he remembers that when the band’s debut album came out in 2003, he was still in college. “My first gig with Rhythmscape was in 2012 after meeting and performing Bickram Ghosh before him. My journey has started since then and I have had the chance to play, learn and travel with the band all over the world. until now.

“In fact, as part of his Drums of India project, I have had the chance to perform at some of the most coveted music festivals in the United States, Europe and South Africa. The Cape Town Jazz Fest is part of.”

Tell him about his electric sitar that he designed himself, and the musician says that with the advent of fusion music, as sitar players started playing in fusion bands, a necessity is Born to make the Sitar sound stand out among instruments like keyboards, electric guitars, bass guitars and drums which all sound very loud and powerful, which would not have been possible with an acoustic sitar.

“Fortunately, I haven’t experienced any criticism from the purists, probably because my Electric Sitar actually sounds like a Sitar and not like a distorted electric guitar like it used to in most cases. have also successfully experimented with its performance in selective fusion gigs. to attract Generation X. I have done a lot of research to select the right combination of mic and processor for my electric sitar so that the originality of the sonority is preserved. My goal has always been to magnify and embellish the original sonority by electrifying the instrument. “

Realizing that the audiences of classical and fusion are distinct, Mallick prefers to keep his two “avatars” distinct. He says: “This way I can continue to experiment with different genres of music while keeping my roots in Hindustani classical music intact.”

Mallick, who was part of the recently organized HCL “Baithak”, believes more corporate houses should come forward to sponsor and promote musicians and artists. “Mandatory CSR activities of corporate houses should also focus on the well-being of musicians and artists. HCL does a tremendous job in terms of creating opportunities, promoting and spreading artists and their work. . “

Currently working on a digital concert series where performances by other artists from across the country will be presented on an international platform, Mallick, along with other musicians, has formed the group “VEDA”. “I play Sitar, Ratul Shankar plays Cajon and Mainak Bumpy Chowdhury is on bass guitar. It’s basically an instrumental setup although sometimes we have singers of different genres. Right now we are working on our next plan to come out in October, “he signed.

(Sukant Deepak can be contacted at [email protected])

–IANS
sukant / pgh


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Electric guitar

Global Industry Growth, Share, Segment Analysis, Current Trends, and Industry Overview Report Forecast to 2027 – The Current Manomet

Guitars are mainly of three types: acoustic, electric and bass guitar. Among these three electric guitars, there are those in which the source of the sound is not primarily the strumming of the strings. Despite a strong output is produced by the movement of the strings which pick up and magnify the sound electronically. Using pedals, you can modify the sound produced by the electric guitar. Whereas in acoustic guitars the vibrations come directly from the strings and therefore their sound cannot be modulated.

The growth dynamics of the market is expected to accelerate throughout the forecast period owing to the constant increase in growth year over year.

Market Scope and Structure Analysis:

Report metric Details
Market size available for years 2020-2027
Reference year considered 2019
Forecast period 2021-2027
Forecast units Value (US $)
Covered segments Type, tailpiece system, neck shape, application, distribution channel and region
Regions covered North America (United States and Canada), Europe (Germany, United Kingdom, France, Italy, Spain and rest of Europe), Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, India, Australia, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia and rest of Asia-Pacific), LAMEA (Middle East, Brazil and rest of LAMEA)
Covered companies Gibson, Yamaha, Fender, Ibanez, CF Martin & Co., Inc., Epiphone Guitar Corp., Jackson, ESP, CORT, Carvin Corporation, Dean guitars and Squier.

Get a sample of the report @ https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/request-sample/6829

COVID-19 scenario analysis:

  • The tentacles of the Corona virus have also captured the music industry.
  • Sales of musical instruments have ceased due to the lockdown situation. This confinement has also resulted in the closure of manufacturing units.
  • Many music events, such as live concerts, music festivals and concert tours have been canceled and postponed.
  • Composers and musicians cannot go to their studios to compose new music.
  • People who relied solely on music concerts found themselves unemployed.
  • Many music albums could not be released because production was stopped.
  • Social distancing has taken a heavy toll on the music and film industry around the world.
  • The artists are in great financial loss.

Main impact factors: analysis of market scenarios, trends, drivers and impact analysis

Electric guitars are used in rock and metal music genres. The popularity of these genres is very high and therefore is one of the main drivers of the global electricity market. Lifestyle changes, increased disposable income and a high standard of living encourage consumers to spend more leisure activities. Thus, the increase in sales of musical instruments. Another reason behind the growth of the global electric guitar market is the increase in the number of musical groups across the world.

The major brake on the growth of the electric guitar is that it is too expensive for most hobbyists. In addition, relatively acoustic guitars are cheaper and require less maintenance.

A major challenge that the electric guitar market may face is that many virtual instrument applications are now available in mobile phones, which is attracting the attention of customers. With this, the cost of making an electric guitar is very high, while there is a shortage of highly skilled and trained manpower.

The biggest opportunities are the increase in music festivals and the continued growth of rock and metal music.

Sellers focus on changing consumer preferences so that market demand can be capitalized. Existing manufacturers are expanding their collection of existing guitars and also acquiring new players. Large electric guitar manufacturing companies are trying to expand their reach globally so they can add value and turn struggling markets into profitable markets.

Many educational institutions have made music a part of their curriculum. This will engage young people and improve their musical skills and knowledge. In addition, helping to increase the demand for musical instruments.

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Key segments covered:

Segments Sub-segments
Type
  • Solid Body Guitar
  • Hollow Body Guitars
  • Electric Acoustic Guitar
  • Seven string guitar
  • Semi-acoustic guitar
  • Chambered body guitar
  • Twelve string electric guitar
Tailpiece system
  • Vibrato arm
  • Hard tail
  • String body
  • Floating tailpiece
Neck shape
  • Folding Neck
  • V-necks
  • C neck
  • U-necks
Application
  • Professional performance
  • Learning and training
  • Individual amateurs
Distribution channel

Main advantages of the report:

  • This study presents the analytical description of the global Electric Guitar industry along with current trends and future estimates to determine impending pockets of investment.
  • The report presents information related to key drivers, restraints, and opportunities along with detailed analysis of the global Electric Guitar market share.
  • The current market is quantitatively analyzed from 2020 to 2027 to highlight the growth scenario of the global Electric Guitar Market.
  • Porter’s Five Forces Analysis illustrates the power of buyers and suppliers in the marketplace.
  • The report provides a detailed analysis of the global electric guitars market based on the intensity of the competition and how the competition will shape in the coming years.

Questions Answered in the Electric Guitar Market Research Report:

  • Who are the major market players active in the Electric Guitar market?
  • What are the current trends that will influence the market in the coming years?
  • What are the driving factors, constraints and opportunities in the market?
  • What future projections would help to take new strategic actions?

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About Allied Market Research:

Allied Market Research (AMR) is a full-service market research and business consulting division of Allied Analytics LLP based in Portland, Oregon. Allied Market Research provides global businesses as well as medium and small businesses with unmatched quality of “market research reports” and “business intelligence solutions”. AMR has a focused vision to provide business information and advisory services to help its clients make strategic business decisions and achieve sustainable growth in their respective market areas. AMR offers its services in 11 verticals including Life Sciences, Consumer Goods, Materials & Chemicals, Construction & Manufacturing, Food & Beverage, Energy & Electricity, semiconductors and electronics, automotive and transportation, ICT and media, aerospace and defense and BFSI.

We have professional relationships with various companies, which helps us extract market data which helps us generate accurate research data tables and confirm the highest accuracy in our market forecast. Each of the data presented in the reports we publish is extracted through primary interviews with senior officials of the main companies in the field concerned. Our secondary data sourcing methodology includes in-depth online and offline research and discussions with industry-savvy professionals and analysts.

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Electric guitar

Vola Guitars offers a new take on classic electric guitar design with its refreshed OZ and Vasti models

Japanese Vola Guitars have released updated versions of their OZ and Vasti solid bodies electric guitars, with beautifully sculpted S and T types, featuring a new neck sculpture and a host of luxurious amenities.

The OZ V3 MC is a bold riff on the quintessential Superstrat style format, with a Vola VHC humbucker in the bridge position and two VS-1 single coils in the middle and neck position. The Vasti V3 MC, meanwhile, has a Vola VDR I mini-humbucker sitting in an ashtray-style bridge, with a Vola VTS I Tele-style single coil at the neck.

While both sport a most unique silhouette, with the angular headstock of the OZ V3 MC scoring bonus chipping points to be reversed, Vola applied a classic formula of violin wood to their construction – the Vasti pairing the ash. with a bolt-on maple neck, with Vola plumping for alder on the OZ.

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Vola OZ and Vasti V3 MC guitars

(Image credit: Vola Guitars)
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Vola OZ and Vasti V3 MC guitars

(Image credit: Vola Guitars)
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Vola OZ and Vasti V3 MC guitars

(Image credit: Vola Guitars)
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Vola OZ and Vasti V3 MC guitars

(Image credit: Vola Guitars)

These revised neck profiles should give the new models a contemporary feel, measuring a svelte 20mm at the first fret, with a very slight taper up to 21mm at the 12th fret. Both models divide the difference between typical Gibson and Fender dimensions by showcasing maple fingerboards with a 12 “Gibson-esque radius and a full 25.5” scale in the style of the bolts that inspired their design.

Quality material has been used everywhere. In addition to the bone nut, both models feature Gotoh bridges – the Vasti with Gotoh’s three-saddle Ti-TC1 unit, the OZ using the 510T-FE1 two-point tremolo system – and tuners. locking.

Like the hardware, the OZ and Vasti are handcrafted in Japan, and there are a number of classic finishes to choose from – all of which look pretty cool on these modern body shapes. The OZ V3 MC is available in 2 Tone Sunburst, Daphne Blue, Surf Green, Vintage Ivory and Shell Pink Gloss, while the Vasti V3 MC is available in 2 Tone Sunburst, Butter Scotch Blonde, Surf Green and Vintage Ivory Gloss.

The OZ sells for $ 1,199 and the Vasti for $ 1,259. For more details and photos, visit Vola Guitars.

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Vola OZ and Vasti V3 MC guitars

(Image credit: Vola Guitars)
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Vola OZ and Vasti V3 MC guitars

(Image credit: Vola Guitars)
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Vola OZ and Vasti V3 MC guitars

(Image credit: Vola Guitars)
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Vola OZ and Vasti V3 MC guitars

(Image credit: Vola Guitars)
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Vola OZ and Vasti V3 MC guitars

(Image credit: Vola Guitars)
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Vola OZ and Vasti V3 MC guitars

(Image credit: Vola Guitars)


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Electric guitar

Gordon Smith Guitars presents the Gatsby, his first offset electric guitar | Guitar.com

Gordon Smith Guitars officially presented the Gatsby, the brand’s first offset model, which comes with P-90s and several colorways.

The Gatsby is available in five solid color finishes on a poplar body, as well as two translucent finishes on Swamp Ash. Both versions feature a maple neck and fingerboard with 22 medium jumbo frets, along with a brass nut and two-way tuning rod.

The electronics include two GS P-90 “home” chrome-coated pickups. These are routed to a simple set of controls including a three-way pickup selector, as well as master volume and tone knobs.

For gear, the Gatsby is fitted with a low profile brass roller bridge paired with an HK41 tremolo system. Meanwhile, its tuners are a set of Gotoh SG381 tuners. There is also a personalized neck plate to commemorate the launch of the instrument.

Hear the Gordon Smith Gatsby in action below:

A GS Gig Bag, Launch Edition Certificate and Exclusive Gordon Smith T-Shirt are also included with each guitar. See the available finishes in the gallery below:

The Gordon Smith Gatsby is now available for purchase in Poplar for £ 1,299 or Swamp Ash for £ 1,399.

Learn more at gordonsmithguitars.com


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Electric guitar

Boss’s first electric guitar comes with a built-in synthesizer

Best known for its boxy guitar and bass effects pedals, Boss also makes amplifiers, wireless systems, drum machines, and many accessories. And now the Roland-owned company has made its own guitar, which has a built-in synthesizer and Bluetooth.

The Eurus GS-1 electronic guitar has a staggered alder body in matte black with Eurus humbuckers at the bridge and neck positions, a Gotoh tremolo bridge, a 5-position reed switch, and volume / tone knobs. Bolted to a 25.5 inch maple neck topped with a rosewood fingerboard that houses 24 medium jumbo frets, and is finished with Gotoh tuners at the head.

Screw-in maple neck cradles a rosewood fingerboard with 24 frets

Chief

The body also houses a toggle switch that engages the built-in polyphonic synthesizer motor which takes advantage of the company’s 40 years of guitar synthesizer know-how for “an amazing range of analog flavored sounds.” Two of the chrome buttons on the body are used to cycle through the six available memory locations that already house ready-made synth sounds and for overall control.

Boss says all synth sounds were designed to respond to normal guitar techniques without any latency or trigger issues spoiling the creative flow. More synth flavors and sound options are available through a free iOS / Android app, with players able to load modified creations before taking to the stage. And a new wireless MIDI expression pedal is also on the way, which can be paired with the guitar via Bluetooth for hands-free, cable-free control of the synthesis engine.

An optional wireless MIDI expression pedal accompanies the release of the Eurus GS-1 electronic guitar, which allows players to wirelessly control the synthesis engine
An optional wireless MIDI expression pedal accompanies the release of the Eurus GS-1 electronic guitar, which allows players to wirelessly control the synthesis engine

Chief

As you might expect, the body side of the guitar is a bit different from other offsets. At the top are the USB and DC power ports (the synth circuitry can be powered from a wall outlet via an optional AC adapter, or from four AA batteries), and at the bottom there is a standard instrument output jack plus a synth output (which allows guitar and synth to be routed to separate destinations for processing flexibility).

The Eurus GS-1 will be available from October for US $ 2,199.99, which includes a carrying bag, while the EV-1-WL wireless MIDI expression pedal can be purchased as an option. priced at $ 149.99. The video below has more.

BOSS EURUS GS-1 Electronic Guitar – Introduction by Yoshi Ikegami

Product sheet: Eurus GS-1 electronic guitar


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